Synergistic Inactivation of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in Natural Waters
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Synergistic Inactivation of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in Natural Waters

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Published by American Water Works Association .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Water,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Environmental Engineering & Technology,
  • Technology & Industrial Arts,
  • Cryptosporidium,
  • Chlorination,
  • Control,
  • Ozonization,
  • Purification

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
Number of Pages157
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8789355M
ISBN 101583212639
ISBN 109781583212639
OCLC/WorldCa51172077

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Assesses and confirms potential synergistic effects of sequential disinfection of Cryptosporidium in natural waters using a well-defined protocol. Provides data to support CT requirements in the Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule. Research partner: USEPA. Published in The synergistic effect of sequential exposure to ozone followed by free chlorine on inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts suspended in natural waters was studied in bench-scale batch reactors. Animal infectivity using neonatal CD-1 mice was used to measure oocyst by: The synergistic effect of sequential exposure to ozone followed by free chlorine on inactivation of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts suspended in natural waters was studied in bench-scale batch. Inactivation of oocysts of Cryptosporidium parvum in clean water using a novel design of an ultraviolet disinfection system was assessed by a vital dye assay and by in vitro excystation.

Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts are prevalent in raw waters used to produce drinking water (LeChevallier and Norton, ). Unfortunately C. parvum oocysts have relatively high resistance to inactivation with common disinfectants such as free chlorine and monochloramine (Korich et al., , Gyürék et al., , Gyürék et al., , Oppenheimer et al., , Driedger et al., , Cited by: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of disinfectant concentration and pH on the inactivation kinetics of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts with ozone, monochloramine, and ozone/monochloramine at 20 °C. Experimental results revealed that the CT (product of disinfectant concentration and contact time) required to achieve a certain level of C. parvum inactivation was . Synergistic Inactivation of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in Natural Waters avg rating — 0 ratings — published Want to Read saving /5(9). Several large-scale outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis caused by contaminated drinking water supplies (19, 23) have increased concern about sources of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in watersheds, especially regarding options for preventing raw water discussed by Walker et al. (), the potential for nonpoint sources of infective oocysts to contaminate source waters is difficult to Cited by:

The synergy levels observed for ozone/monochloramine sequential disinfection at low temperature present a potential solution for the inactivation of C. parvum oocysts in regions where the water temperature may approach the freezing point. Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts have been known to cause adverse health effects worldwide, and processes that contribute to their inactivation have gained wide attention in recent years. Solar inactivation is an important process that can improve surface water quality. Solar disinfection (SODIS) can be used to disinfect water as a point-of-use alternative, and disinfect wastewater in waste. Cryptosporidium is a significant cause of water-borne enteric disease throughout the world and represents a challenge to the water industry and a threat to public health. In this study we report the use of a cell culture-TaqMan PCR assay to measure oocyst inactivation rates in reagent-grade and environmental waters over a range of temperatures. A pilot-scale study was conducted to evaluate the inactivation by ozone against Cryptosporidium oocysts, Giardia cysts, poliovirus, and B. subtilis endospores spiked into Ohio River water.